Soursop

Soursop is the fruit of Annona muricata, a broadleaf, flowering, evergreen tree.  The exact origin is unknown; it is native to the tropical regions of the Americas and is widely propagated.  The flavour of the fruit has been described as a combination of strawberry and pineapple, with sour citrus flavour notes contrasting with an underlying creamy texture reminiscent of coconut or banana.

Due to the fruit’s widespread cultivation and popularity in parts of Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, Southeast Asia and the Pacific, soursop and its derivative products are consumed across the world, also via branded food and beverage products available in many countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Canada, the United States, the UK, Ireland and Continental Europe, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore and Vietnam.

In Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, and Harar (Ethiopia), it is a common fruit, often used for dessert as the only ingredient, or as an agua fresca beverage; in Colombia and Venezuela, it is a fruit for juices, mixed with milk.  In Cuba, a thick smoothie made of soursop pulp, milk and cane sugar goes by the name of champola.  Ice cream and fruit bars made of soursop are also very popular.  The seeds are normally left in the preparation, and removed while consuming, unless a blender is used for processing.

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